Amazon.com…Check Me Out…

July 5, 2016-Hello readers and followers! I know it’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything on myguidedpen.com and I apologize for that. I’ve been extremely busy with a slew of other projects and my children’s book launch is just one of them. I’ve written a really awesome guide called An Easy Guide to Writing for Children which is available for download on Amazon.com. You can also search me by first and last name, Lacey Bakker. I hope that you’ll download it and leave a review! Thanks so much for all of your support and for reading this blog and my others.

L

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Free images for poets. Part Three. Abandoned Summer Houses. Twelve pictures — MARKOVICH PHOTO ART

Photos: Alex Markovich. Camera: SONY SLT-A55V. April 23, 2016. Dear poets, writers, artists and all creative people! Feel free to use any pictures on your social networks, sites, blogs, etc. If you need a larger image to be published offline, please let me know and I will send you the original file. I appreciate if you share […]

via Free images for poets. Part Three. Abandoned Summer Houses. Twelve pictures — MARKOVICH PHOTO ART

It’s All About Point of View…

Let’s talk about point of view for this writing exercise, but first things first-what exactly is Point of View?

Point of view refers to the way the author allows you to see and hear what’s going on it the novel, book, short story or manuscript. We’ll focus on four main points of view:

    • First-person point of view is in use when a character narrates the story with I-me-my-mine. The reader is sitting beside the character and is viewing the world through the eyes of that character. The reader experiences the world through the eyes of only one person.
    • Second-person point of view, the author uses your and you, this is rare; authors rarely speak directly to the reader. If you do happen to come across this point of view, you should pay attention because the author is trying to tell you something.  Second-person point of view draws the reader into the story, and makes the reader participate in the action.
    • Third-person point of view is that of an outsider looking at the action. This is the most common point of view. The author’s voice, not the character’s voice, is what you hear in the descriptive passages.
    • Objective-point of view is when the narrator is a fly on the wall or a video camera in the corner of the room. The character’s thoughts are never known. Objective point of view is all about watching, listening and observing.

Try writing from a different point of view and step outside of your comfort zone. This allows you to stretch your abilities and who knows, you may actually really like a particular point of view that you had never considered before. Happy Writing!

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Advice….Learn as much as possible…

This weekend I am fortunate enough to be attending a two day workshop at the College I attended a million years ago. It’s another writing for children course and I’m very excited to attend; it’s great to meet new authors, have your work critiqued and of course network with like minded people who understand the hurdles of the industry.

I really recommend that aspiring AND published authors take advantage of such programs in their city/community because they’re  an excellent source of ideas, education and fun. At the last workshop I attended I was reminded of so many things that had sort of fallen by the wayside and this caused me to write much more diligently. Sometimes we all need to brush up on our skills a little bit even if we’ve been doing this for years.

I’ll report back  about what I’ve learned over the weekend and share some tips, tricks, ideas and inspiration with you to help you become the best writer that you can be!

So take advantage of courses, workshops, free events, classes, talks and meetings in your area…it might lead you to exactly what you need to know or to an idea for your next best seller! Happy Writing!

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